Science In Brief

Chiropractic Litterature Review

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The Study: The association of lumbar curve magnitude and spinal range of motion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a cross-sectional study                    

The Facts:

  1. Spinal alignment affects the loading on the lumbar area and the intervertebral discs.
  2. "Due to the wedging of the disc or vertebrae of unbalanced spinal segments, alignment change may affect the range of motion (ROM) of individual segments or the global spine"
  3. The authors wanted to look at a correlation of range of motion to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS).
  4. They looked at 12 male and 46 females with a mean age of 15.7 years who had adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.
  5. "Spine ROM was assessed clinically in coronal, sagittal and axial motion planes."
  6. Posteroanterior whole radiographs were taken.
  7. The authors concluded, "We found that the coronal curve severity is associated with reduced axial and coronal ROM."  

Take Home:

The severity of the coronal curve (scoliosis) in these adolescent subjects was directly associated with reduced axial and coronal ROM.

 

Reviewer's Comments:

Biomechanics matter. It seems that health care related to spines is often summed up in terms of symptoms, but there is a lot more to it than that.

Reviewer: Roger Coleman DC

Editor’s Comments: Once again, we see the impact of structure on function. Whether spinal imbalance occurs in the coronal (frontal) plane as in this study, or in the sagittal plane as we have reviewed in so many other papers, the overarching message is clear…Structure Determines Function. Doctors who attempt to restore spinal function/motion without making their best attempt to correct the underlying structure are almost certainly shortchanging their patients.

Editor: Mark R. Payne DC

 

Reference: Eyvazov K, Samartzis D, Cheung JP. The association of lumbar curve magnitude and spinal range of motion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a cross-sectional study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2017 Jan 31;18(1):51. doi: 10.1186/s12891-017-1423-6.

Link to Abstract: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28143455

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