Science In Brief

Chiropractic Litterature Review

sidebar2

The Study: The effects of cervical joint manipulation, based on passive motion analysis, on cervical lordosis, forward head posture, and cervical ROM in university students with abnormal posture of the cervical spine.

The Facts:

  1. 40 students complaining of chronic neck pain and who had a range of motion of less than 70 degrees in extension and 35 degrees in flexion along with a forward head posture of more than 15mm and a cervical lordosis on x-ray that was less than 21 degrees were used in the study.
  2. They were divided into two groups.
  3. One group received general mobilization.
  4. The other group was placed supine and they were manually examined to find restrictions.
  5. For extension the subjects were checked for restriction in the left and right cervical facet joints while supine and the restricted areas were manipulated. This was done for C2-C6.
  6. For flexion and side bending the subjects were check for restrictions while supine and the restricted joints manipulated. This was done for C4-C5.
  7. e. The manipulation group showed improvement in forward head posture, cervical lordosis, cervical extension and extension/flexion range of motion.
  8. Mobilization improved cervical extension and forward head posture.
  9. Cervical extension and cervical extension/flexion range of motion was significantly higher in the manipulation group as compared to the mobilization group.

Take Home:

This type of cervical manipulation might improve forward head posture, cervical lordosis and cervical range of motion.

Reviewer's Comments:

This study was conducted by a PhD, PT from the Department of Physical Therapy at the Korea Nazarene University. When performing the manipulation the provider attempted to isolate the restricted joint and to manipulate that joint. It appears they were attempting to provide a specific manipulation to a specific area to improve the motion of that joint and the care also improved structural alignment.

Reviewer:Roger Coleman DC

 

Editor’s Comments: The average correction in the cervical lordosis (ARA) achieved by the manipulation group was 5.2 degrees which compares very favorably with most studies which have looked at chiropractic adjustment/manipulation. Patients received a 10 minute session of manipulation three times weekly for four weeks. Spinal change was measured using before and after radiographs. The mobilization only group averaged only 2.6 degrees of improvement in the lordosis.

Once again we have physical therapists analyzing posture with radiography and motion palpation procedures and then documenting improvements in spinal posture using post treatment radiographs. Meanwhile chiropractors just keep turning out one study after another on back pain while our very profession is stolen in broad daylight..

Editor: Mark R. Payne DC

 

Reference: Gong W. The effects of cervical joint manipulation, based on passive motion analysis, on cervical lordosis, forward head posture, and cervical ROM in university students with abnormal posture of the cervical spine. J Phys Ther Sci. 2015 May;27(5):1609-11

Link to Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26157273

Sign up/Logon for Free Subscription

Follow Us

       

Need help or more information?

Contact Us

Search

Subscribe today

subscribe-sticker

Science In Brief 

Copyright © 2013. All Rights Reserved.